Auto-Brewery Syndrome Strikes

Auto-Brewery Syndrome Strikes

There is a new condition found in the human body which can be mistaken for drunkenness. A man was recently arrested on the suspicion of drunken-driving. The police and doctors did not believe the 46 year-old.  His blood-alcohol level was 0.2, more than twice the limit for driving a vehicle. The suspect refused a breath-analyzer test and was hospitalized. But the fact remained that he showed excessive blood-alcohol levels.

Researchers then discovered an unusual fact. The man had fungi in his digestive system that could turn carbohydrates into alcohol - a rarely diagnosed condition called 'auto-brewery syndrome'.  People having this syndrome  can have fermenting bacteria or fungi in the gut that produces ethanol and causes patients to exhibit drunkenness.

The condition is also called gut fermentation syndrome that can be caused in people, especially with obesity, diabetes or Crohn's disease. Such people usually register high levels of blood-alcohol. Symptoms in people with this syndrome includes depression, memory loss and aggressive behaviour.

People with auto-brewery syndrome may smell like alcohol or feel tired; too spent to spend time with family or go for work. The syndrome seems to be caused when taking antibiotics that can alter the fungal growth in a person. However, researchers are still not sure why antibiotics should cause this syndrome. People should test their blood-alcohol levels whenever symptoms manifest. Anti-fungal medications, probiotics and low-carb diets can help treat this condition.